Whilst it is true to say that the renovation of the pond has drawn some adverse criticism, it also true to say that there is support for the scheme.

I was at the pond when the felling started to take some photos for the blog and visited again the next day when the job was well underway. As I stood watching, I asked villagers passing by what they thought of the renovation scheme. Some expressed the view that they were expecting ‘ just pruning’ and ‘a general tidying up’ rather than the general clearance that has taken place. Another couple of villagers told me that they were ‘happy to wait and see what it looks like’ and others wondered what would happen to the ducks.

The start of the felling across the icy pond.

The start of the felling across the icy pond.

The planned renovation of the pond has been under consideration for sometime by the Parish Council and the Pond Committee and professional advice has been sought at every stage. The plan was to fell most of the present trees which are mainly self seeded sycamores and to remove the dense undergrowth that had developed over the years on the North bank of the pond. It is obvious that you cannot remove that many trees without radically changing the look and visual impact of the pond. However, the Tree Officer for East Riding Council would not have approved the scheme if it were not for the line of mature trees, belonging to the properties, behind the pond.

A sad looking pond

A sad looking pond

So, we are now where we are, with a pond that looks very sorry for itself. But looking forward, the next stage of the plan is ready to go with the replanting of the new trees and shrubs expected to start by the end of this month. As the Chairman of the Parish Council wrote (December Blog) “This clear-out of the old will provide a ‘once in a generation’ opportunity to plan for and plant trees presenting a wide variety of foliage, colour and shape which is not currently present. Discussions with representatives of various interested bodies and the advice of an experienced plantsman has produced a planting scheme of trees underplanted with shrubs.”

Pond view from the shelter.

Pond view from the shelter.

Many of the new trees vary in height between 10 feet to 15 feet, so we can safely say that they are semi-mature specimens (not saplings). There are also a number of smaller twisted willows and dogwood bushes to be planted between the trees. The backdrop to the pond will therefore provide height, colour and shade within a short timescale, but of course, it will not happen overnight. A little patience is required. On a more upbeat note, it has been reported that a villager has very generously agreed to pay for the replanting of the North Bank of the pond. This wonderful example of community spirit should be applauded.

We look forward to the new more colourful backdrop to the pond and whether you support the scheme, or not, we have to live with the reality that something needed to be done, and so, let’s do it on a grand scale. Keep the vision!

Posted on: 18, March, 2018 | Author: editor
Categories: General
3 Responses to The Pond
  1. I am just wondering, and would love to hear if anyone can enlighten…
    is our pond natural, or is it manmade? And if the later- when was it created.
    But I would also love to hear any other history or information about the pond please

  2. Hi Robin, thanks for the comment. Will see what I can find out!

  3. Hi Robin – sorry for the delay. I’ve discussed the pond with a local expert and he told me that the pond was around at the time of the Doomsday Book and possibly as long ago as the 8th century. The pond would have been one of the main reasons for the early development of the village. The water in the pond is fed from an underground source. The waterfall is pure decoration.

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